Kombucha Tea

About 6 months ago my husband, chefmartinburke, introduced our household to the health benefits of Kombucha Tea. A 2000 year old Chinese health elixir. He came home with a Scoby¬†which looks like something I’d grown in a petri dish as high school back in the 80’s. The Scoby ferments the tea and by adding flavours creates a somewhat delicious if unusual early morning drink.

Martin had a few trial runs with different flavours and tested his brew with his family, me. We had a few explosions, one of which was an over fermented Spirulina flavoured (and coloured!) infusion which although not funny at the time, left a hysterically huge dark green splatter across the kitchen walls and ceiling. 6 months on and we are happily supping away a glass a day of various concoctions with spice, herbs, fruits and grasses.

Whether I’m receiving any health benefits would maybe be a bit early to say but it sure makes a great subject to photograph and goes perfectly with my new rusty backdrop I made.

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The exact origination of kombucha, how or where, is unknown. The drink was consumed in East Russia at least as early as 1900, and from there entered Europe.

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Kombucha Tea is made from sweetened tea that’s been fermented by a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast called a Scoby.

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Some adverse health effects of Kombucha Tea may be due to the acidity of the tea, which can cause acidosis, and brewers have been cautioned to avoid over-fermentation.

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Kombucha Tea has been promoted with claims that it can treat a wide variety of human illnesses, including AIDS, cancer, and diabetes, and that it provides other beneficial effects such as stimulation of the immune system, boosting the libido, and reversal of gray hair. However, evidence of kombucha’s beneficial effects in humans is limited.

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